How to Prepare for an ICE Raid

UPDATE: On June 22, 2019, President Trump announced that he will “hold off” on the massive deportations for two weeks.

President Trump has promised “massive” ICE raids beginning June 23, 2019, apparently focused on persons who have final orders of removal.  It generally happens, however, that whenever ICE officers go into a community searching for specific persons, ICE often arrests other persons who they find.

Here are some things to keep in mind to prepare for an ICE raid:

  • You have the right to remain silent, if you wish
  • Record details of your encounter with ICE
  • Record names of officers, if you are able to
  • Do NOT run away from ICE officers
  • Do NOT sign any document that you do not understand and that you do not wish to sign
  • Tell the ICE officer that you want to speak to an attorney
  • If you do speak to ICE, tell the truth.

If ICE comes to the door of your home:

  • Do NOT open the door
  • ICE is ONLY allowed to enter if they have a valid search or arrest warrant with the correct name and address, signed by a judge
  • Ask the ICE officer to slip the warrant under the door or to hold it up to a window so that you can read it.
  • If ICE shows you a warrant of deportation or removal, and if that document is NOT signed by a judge, then you do NOT need to open the door.
  • If ICE does not show you a warrant signed by a judge, then politely tell ICE that you are not required to open the door.

If ICE enters your home:

  • Remain calm
  • Call an attorney immediately
  • You do not need to say anything. Instead you can say that you have the right to remain silent
  • Do NOT sign any document that you do not understand and that you do not wish to sign.

Another New Policy: Indefinite Detention for Some Asylum Seekers

Attorney General William Barr recently issued a decision that overturns a policy that is at least 14 years old, and which threatens to keep many asylum applicants in jail while their cases are pending for months or years.

In Matter of M-S-, issued on April 16, 2019, the Attorney General decided that for persons who enter the United States without permission and who are encountered by U.S. immigration officials shortly after their entry, and who seek asylum, these persons are not eligible for bonds to be released from detention.  The only options for these persons are to remain in detention until the completion of their cases in Immigration Court (which could last for months or years), or to be released from jail on parole from U.S. immigration officials.

The Attorney General’s decision overturns a decision of the Board of Immigration Appeals from 2005.

Because the Attorney General’s decision has the potential to require the detention of so many persons, the Department of Homeland Security requested that the Attorney General delay the effective date of the decision.  The Attorney General agreed, and has delayed the effective date of the decision for 90 days, so that U.S. immigration officials may acquire more facilities to detain asylum applicants.  It appears that the new policy will go into effect on or around July 15, 2019.

The Attorney General’s decision appears to be yet another policy shift by the Trump Administration to try to discourage persons from applying for asylum and to make it as difficult as possible for those asylum applicants to navigate the legal system.  Winning asylum in the United States is difficult even under the most favorable conditions.  Those persons seeking asylum while in jail face many more obstacles.  It is much more difficult to meet with attorneys and others who wish to help the persons prepare their cases.  There is much less time to prepare cases, because detained persons are typically on court schedules that progress much more quickly that those who are not in jail.  It is much more difficult for jailed persons to communicate with family and friends to help to prepare the case and obtain documents in their home countries to help prove their asylum claims.

The Trump Administration will also further burden U.S. taxpayers by spending more money on detaining asylum applicants for months or years at a time.

As with other new policies, the Attorney General’s decision in Matter of M-S- will very likely be appealed in court.  The final outcome of the new policy is uncertain.

Detention without a bond hearing

A recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court makes it easier for the U.S. government to arrest and detain without bond noncitizens who have been convicted of certain crimes.

The statute that was the focus of the Supreme Court’s decision in Nielsen v. Preap is Section 236(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. Section 1226(c).  The statute states that the federal government “shall take into custody” a noncitizen who has been convicted of certain crimes “when … released.”

Many U.S. district courts around the country, including the federal district court in Detroit, interpreted the “when … released” language to mean that U.S. officials needed to arrest and detain a noncitizen when he or she is released from custody as a result of the criminal conviction, or at least shortly after release from criminal custody.  If there was a significant gap in time between the release of the noncitizen from criminal custody and the federal government’s arrest of the noncitizen, many federal district courts ordered the federal government to release the noncitizen, because of the government’s failure to arrest and detain the noncitizen “when … released.”

But the U.S. Supreme Court, by a 5-4 decision, concluded that the federal government may arrest and detain a noncitizen in this situation at any time, including years or even decades after release from criminal custody.

In dissent, Justice Breyer, joined by Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor, and Kagan, wrote that Congress “did not intend to allow the Government to apprehend persons years after their release from prison and hold them indefinitely without a bail hearing.”

Unfortunately, the Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision clears the way for the federal government to detain certain noncitizens without providing them the possibility of a bond hearing.

Preparing for Immigration Enforcement

Susan Reed, the Managing Attorney at the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center (MIRC), has prepared a 4-minute video that provides some tips on how you can prepare yourself and your family for the possibility of a visit from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).  I recommend that you take four minutes to watch this video, and consider the tips that MIRC suggests.

Thanks to Susan Reed and MIRC for your efforts!