Proving U.S. Citizenship

Some people are actually U.S. Citizens, but don’t realize it.

If you were born outside the United States, you might be a U.S. Citizen if one or both of your parents is or was a U.S. Citizen.  The question of whether or not you are a U.S. Citizen is determined by the U.S. laws that were in effect on the day of your birth.

Under the “Resources” section of our website, we have some brief documents that outline various aspects of Immigration Law.

Naturalization: Becoming a U.S. Citizen

If you have been a Lawful Permanent Resident for at least 4 years and 9 months, you might be eligible to apply to “naturalize,” or become a U.S. Citizen.  If you have been a Lawful Permanent Resident for at least 2 years and 9 months, AND you have been, and continue to be, married to a U.S. Citizen during that time, then you might be eligible to apply for naturalization.

Under the “Resources” section of our website, we have some brief documents that outline various aspects of Immigration Law.

We have provided some basic information about the process of naturalization.  Please take a look.

Congress investigates USCIS delays in new processing program

Congress is looking into a delayed program to computerize the immigration application process.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is heading the “Transformation” program, which began in 2007 with a budget of $536 million and a plan to automate the paper-based application process by 2013.

So far, $630 million has been spent, current cost estimates have ballooned to $2.2 billion, and the project is scheduled to be completed in 2022.

In a February 16 letter to the Director of USCIS, Senator Chuck Grassley, Republican of Iowa, wrote, “I’m concerned that very few improvements have been made since the Government Accountability Office reported to Congress in 2007 about the Transformation initiative. . . . The GAO and the inspector general have noted that ‘efforts to modernize . . . have been unfocused, conducted in an ad hoc and decentralized manner, and in certain instances, duplicative.’ “

You can read the complete article here.